Tech–nooooooo!

First, an update from my previous entry:

My friendly freckled student and came to me today and told me, “I think I have someone for you.”

“Oh yeah?” I replied.

“Yeah, but I think she’s forty.”

Tech know? or Tech No?

“Next year when I begin talking about this project and how fun it is because I’ve forgotten, will you tell me ‘never again’?”

“What?” my cohort responded.

“You heard me.  In fact, when I suggest it for next year, punch me in the face.”

That was the conversation that took place after school today, due to the poor decision I made to have my sixth graders use computers to make a project “fun”.  

The problem is that sixth graders know nothing about computers.  Now, you might think to yourself that these kids have grown up with computers.  They’ve never known a world without the internet; they’re the iPod/Pad/Phone generation and whatnot.  But friends, here’s the truth: they don’t have a clue about actual, real life computers. Yes they play games on iPhones.  They can work a wii or pound a playstation with their eyes closed.  However, they cannot double-click.  

Having these students in the lab is a hair-greying experience.  These kids can’t remember their passwords, have never seen the “save” icon, or know what a right-click means.  I have literally had to walk students click by click through every facet of every instruction.  I can’t give a command such as “save your work” because they have no idea what to do.  

They get frustrated.  I get frustrated.  Their final products will suck, and I will have to watch them all.  

Oh well.  Click “Publish Post”.

 

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One thought on “Tech–nooooooo!

  1. OK, you hit the nail on the head here. My school is huge on tech; we have close to ten computer carts with 35+ computers each (Macs and HPs with Chromebooks on the way). It is insanely frustrating to plan a lesson and project on the computer that you think the students will love only to then go to school the next day and spend half the work time trouble shooting “deleted” shortcuts to Safari and Internet Explorer, internet that doesn’t work at all, forgotten passwords, websites without the appropriate plug-ins installed, and students who simply have no clue how to work the computer and won’t even try without you breathing down their neck.
    I did that and my VP happened to be observing me at the time. I’m absolutely certain he saw the frustration in my face (I was ready to snap, probably because he was in the room observing me and I wasn’t on point). When we met later he said I handled it like a pro. I liked the compliment, but I don’t like the insinuation that using tech in the classroom is ALWAYS like that.
    How are we supposed to teach to these tests while simultaneously introducing tech into the classroom that almost always fails? I love using tech, but I hate how incredibly frustrating it is.

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